Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘prophets’

If a man divorces his wife
and she goes from him
and becomes another man’s wife,
will he return to her?
Would not that land be greatly polluted?
You have played the whore with many lovers;
and would you return to me?
declares the Lord
– Jeremiah 3:1 (ESV)

 

Recap of Week #2: God expects us to go and proclaim what He has set aside for us as our assignment.  God expects obedience from us in doing so.

Reflection on Week#2:  Jeremiah was called on to do some hard work.  He was to deliver a controversial message to his own people.  Not many men could do so in the face of rejection and ridicule.

God speaks in a straightforward tone and gets straight to the point. You have played the whore with many lovers (v. 1).  God does not pull any punches.  He just comes out with a metaphoric scenario about divorce, and then calls His people the equivalent of harlots.

If God calls you names like that. You need to rethink your next move with God.

This was not the first time God called out Israel, though.  He used Gomer to demonstrate the harlotry of the people of God and their strained relationship with Him.  In Isaiah, the Lord’s accusation against Israel is clear: How the faithful city has become a whore (Isaiah 1:21, ESV).  Don’t be shocked at the language.  God was in a rightful position to call out Israel.  After all, He knew them well and the ways of men were beneath Him.

Do you repent and turn back to God again? Or, do you simply take it all in and spend a moment alone with the thought of what God really thinks of you?

Make sure you review the Week #3 Bible Study Guide.

#JeremiahJourney2020

NOTE:

Due to a change in digital download providers, our latest work has been hours upon hours comparing services and pricing to continue to offer FREE downloads of our weekly study guides.  While this has thrown off our journey’s pace a bit, we do have an answer.

Find the Week #1 Bible Study Guide and Week #2 Bible Study Guide as well as all other future guides and FREE downloads via Scribd.

Thank you for your patience and we look forward to continuing to deliver more along the journey.

Read Full Post »

The word of the Lord came to me, saying,  “Go and proclaim in the hearing of Jerusalem, Thus says the Lord. . .  – Jeremiah 2:1-2 (ESV)

Recap of Week #1: God’s calling of Jeremiah was met with some resistance on Jeremiah’s part.  However, God used object lessons to grab Jeremiah’s attention and to show him the coming fate of Israel.

Reflection on Week#1:  Jeremiah was young and not chief among the priests or prophets of his times.  His message was a direct order from God, but it was definitely not going to be received well by his fellow brothers in the ministry or his countrymen.

What we find to be the call to action by God in our lives is usually something that calls us to take a step outside of our comfort zone.  With such a task at hand, Jeremiah should have been comforted by God’s assurance that He would supply and support Jeremiah all along the way, no matter who or what he faced while on assignment.  Jeremiah reveals the human infallibility buried deep within us all to still want more than what God offers, clinging to what we know rather than what we could possibly experience and have with God’s blessing.

If God calls you to it, God will see you through it.

Go and Proclaim

Once you have accepted God’s calling on your life, marching orders are bound to follow.  Just from the opening lines of chapter 2, you can see that God wants Jeremiah to get to work immediately.

There is no extensive training program.  No mentor prophet lends his wisdom and sage advice to Jeremiah.  It’s just God’s calling and an immediate assignment of “Go and proclaim…”

Thus Says the Lord

You can only imagine the gravity of Jeremiah’s message.  He was called as God’s messenger to deliver an unpopular message to God’s people.  Also, he was to go and proclaim what the Lord had to say to Israel.

As you read this week, check out God’s intense message to Israel.  Hear the words of the Lord delivered to Israel through Jeremiah in this initial message.  Get a feel for what weighed heavily in the heart of the Lord when it came to His beloved Israel.

Make sure you review the Week #2 Bible Study Guide.

#JeremiahJourney2020

Read Full Post »

“For this the earth shall mourn,
    and the heavens above be dark;
for I have spoken; I have purposed;
    I have not relented, nor will I turn back.”

-Jeremiah 4:28 (ESV)

Last week, we looked at chapter 4 in Jeremiah and saw God’s frustration with Israel’s idolatry.  At the end of the day, we learn how God’s wrath is on its way.  It is presented as inevitable as well as eventual with an invasion from the North.

How can I pardon you?
    Your children have forsaken me
    and have sworn by those who are no gods.
When I fed them to the full,
    they committed adultery
    and trooped to the houses of whores.

-Jeremiah 5:7 (ESV)

God refuses to hold back as He stated in Jeremiah 4:28.  Yet, the rebellious children of Israel refused to repent.  God calls out for them to repent.  God calls them on their mess, expecting them to turn their hearts again towards God, but they continued to rebel and not repent.

As you read through chapter 5 this week, answer the following questions:

  1. What is God’s desire for Israel as He presented in the first 4 chapters of Jeremiah?
  2. How does God describe Israel’s rebellion?
  3. Write down some key terms from chapter 5 that let you know what has become of the relationship between God and Israel.
  4. Summarize your thoughts and ideas regarding chapter 5 in one phrase or sentence.

Feel free to answer these questions via comments directly to the blog post, i.e. Question #1: God wanted loyalty and fidelity from Israel, especially the House of Israel.  Keep your eyes out for a special activity this weekend as we move on to chapter 6.

Read Full Post »

Why do you contend with me?
    You have all transgressed against me,
declares the Lord.

Jeremiah 2:29 (ESV)

Part of our work last week was to look at chapter 2 and reflect.  Our reflective responses are still being collected this week.  Be sure to log and submit your answers for us.  We want to share our collective responses in the near future.

Looking Ahead

If a man divorces his wife
    and she goes from him
and becomes another man’s wife,
    will he return to her?
Would not that land be greatly polluted?
You have played the whore with many lovers;
    and would you return to me?
declares the Lord.

-Jeremiah 3:1 (NLT)

The opening lines of chapter 3 are enough to make some Christians unsettled.

God’s judgment is direct and open.  There is no holding back.  He lets loose and it is all fire.  He doesn’t give the people any break or leeway.  He just speaks on what they have done and what it really looks like to Him.

. . .You have played the whore with many lovers. . .

The comparison to whorees is a direct correlation to the idolatry of Israel.  It is akin to Isaiah’s opening chapter.  It is reflective in a metaphoric sense to God’s appeal to Hosea, utilizing Hosea’s match with Gomer as a symbolic object lesson about His own relationship with a whore-like nation of “chosen people.”

If a man divorces his wife
    and she goes from him
and becomes another man’s wife,
    will he return to her?
Would not that land be greatly polluted?

Spend some time this week reflecting on one single question: Has my relationship with the Lord been pure or polluted lately? Which one and what makes you say so? Think about it as you read chapter 3 in Jeremiah.  Compare it to Isaiah chapter 1.  Look at it in light of Hosea’s major  hurdle.  Then look at your response again after having read chapter 3.  Feel free to comment directly to this post with your responses.

Read Full Post »

And Jesus said to them, “A prophet is not without honor, except in his hometown and among his relatives and in his own household.”  – Mark 6:4 (ESV)

. . . A prophet is honored everywhere except in his own hometown and among his own family.  – Matthew 13:57 (NLT)

A Prophet is Without Honor

Jesus said it.

He stated it in simple and straightforward.

The position of the prophet is peculiar.

The prophet is from among the people but has the “burden” of carrying God’s message to the people.  The prophet stands out from everyone else while speaking out against the social and spiritual wrongs of the people against God.

That is a peculiar position, even a complicated calling, for anyone.

Why the Jeremiah Journey

Jeremiah was a prophet who is known among the “major prophets.” He is known for both the Book of Jeremiah and Lamentations.  His prophecy was unpopular among both the priest and other prophets, even the people.

Jeremiah was known as the “weeping prophet.”

Imagine being God’s vessel and voice with a message that put you odds with your peers and fellow tribesmen.  That would definitely bring about some emotional conflicts.  You would surely question what God was truly trying to do through you and with you.

That was Jeremiah’s journey.

How the Jeremiah Journey Works

  • Read a chapter of the Book of Jeremiah week by week during 2018
  • Check the midweek Bible study questions to further explore each week’s chapter
  • Sign up for our weekly e-newsletter for inspiration on reading
  • Visit this blog week by week to get insights and reflections on the weekly reading, even comments on the journey

What we can expect through such a Bible reading and study program:

  • A thorough reading and study of one of the most dynamic characters of the Bible
  • A chapter by chapter reading of one of the prophetic books of the Bible
  • A deeper relationship with God’s Word through consistent reading and study of the Bible, especially if you do not have any other Bible study or devotional reading that you are currently reading

Join the Jeremiah Journey. #JointheJourney

Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required
Email Address *

First Name
Last Name
Email Format
  • html
  • text

Read Full Post »

11 He came unto his own, and his own received him not.

12 But as many as received him, to them gave he power to become the sons of God, even to them that believe on his name:

13 Which were born, not of blood, nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of man, but of God.

– John 1:11-13 (KJV)

We know that He came.  He arrived almost in as miraculous fashion as His conception.  He arrived to poverty.  He arrived to persecution.  He arrived to save humanity.

However, what about before He arrived? What was going on?

John tells it like this in John 1:1-3 (NIV):

 In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God,and the Word was God. He was with God in the beginning.Through him all things were made; without him nothing was made that has been made

Before He arrived, prophets spoke of Him coming:

The Spirit of the Lord God is upon me; because the Lord hath anointed me to preach good tidings unto the meek; he hath sent me to bind up the brokenhearted, to proclaim liberty to the captives, and the opening of the prison to them that are bound; To proclaim the acceptable year of the Lord, and the day of vengeance of our God; to comfort all that mourn; To appoint unto them that mourn in Zion, to give unto them beauty for ashes, the oil of joy for mourning, the garment of praise for the spirit of heaviness; that they might be called trees of righteousness, the planting of the Lord, that he might be glorified.Isaiah 61:1-3 (KJV)

Before He came, angels spoke of His coming:

31 And, behold, thou shalt conceive in thy womb, and bring forth a son, and shalt call his name Jesus32 He shall be great, and shall be called the Son of the Highest: and the Lord God shall give unto him the throne of his father David – Luke 1:31-32 (KJV)

20 But while he thought on these things, behold, the angel of the Lord appeared unto him in a dream, saying, Joseph, thou son of David, fear not to take unto thee Mary thy wife: for that which is conceived in her is of the Holy Ghost. 21 And she shall bring forth a son, and thou shalt call his name Jesus: for he shall save his people from their sins. 22 Now all this was done, that it might be fulfilled which was spoken of the Lord by the prophet, saying, 23 Behold, a virgin shall be with child, and shall bring forth a son, and they shall call his name Emmanuel, which being interpreted is, God with us. – Matthew 1:20-23 (KJV)

. . . Emmanuel, which being interpreted is, God with us.  

He came to be with His people.  He came to live among them.  He came to bring them life and eternal life.

John’s Gospel says He arrived like this:  The Word became flesh and made his dwelling among us. We have seen his glory, the glory of the one and only Son, who came from the Father, full of grace and truth. (John 1:14, NIV)

Isaiah’s prophecy in Chapter 53 described Him as:

. . .  he hath no form nor comeliness; and when we shall see him, there is no beauty that we should desire him. He is despised and rejected of men; a man of sorrows, and acquainted with grief: and we hid as it were our faces from him; he was despised, and we esteemed him not. Surely he hath borne our griefs, and carried our sorrows: yet we did esteem him stricken, smitten of God, and afflicted.

But keep in mind that He came right on time.  He came for the redemption of “those under the law” just as Paul wrote so many years ago.  He came for all of the right reasons.

But when the set time had fully come, God sent his Son, born of a woman, born under the law, to redeem those under the law, that we might receive adoption to sonship.

– Galatians 4:4-5 (NIV)

Read Full Post »

But they that wait upon the Lord shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings as eagles; they shall run, and not be weary; and they shall walk, and not faint. – Isaiah 40:31 (KJV)

Have you ever just wanted to quit?

Elijah ran away into hiding to quit.  Jonah booked passage on a ship headed out of Joppa and headed to Tarshish.  Jeremiah wept bitterly before the Lord, swearing not to speak His name again.  If a prophet could cal it quits, certainly one of us can.

Or, so we think.

In Isaiah chapter 40, we are given a depiction of both God and His people.  The Word reveals the inner workings of the intimate relationship between Jehovah and Jacob, the Almighty and Israel.  A clear view of how God is miraculous and wondrous in His ways arises from the words of comfort offered to the Lord’s prophet to be spoken to the eager ears of the people of Zion.

We want to rationalize our decisions, especially those decisions that might cause us some conflicts with our walk.  It is even harder when we find our decisions to become contrary to all that we have preached, taught and counseled others not to do.  We become hypocrites at that point.  We are saying one thing for others to do in their daily walk with the Lord and not doing any of what we have said ourselves.  That is seriously hypocritical and outright dangerous.

He giveth power to the faint; and to them that have no might he increaseth strength.– Isaiah 40:29

The Lord’s words sooth the discouraged and encourage those running on empty.  He can renew you by refueling you with power and strength.  You can be ready to throw in the towel, but that second wind emerges from somewhere beyond your gut.  You can wish that it was all over and that God would just take you out of your misery, but He provides enough for you to keep going on and getting stronger as you serve more earnestly.  He is able to fuel you as well as fill you.

Let the Lord put your heart and mind at ease.  Don’t stress yourself over your next major move or serious decision.  Listen to His words through His prophet.  become encouraged by what He says he will do for the weak and the empty as well as “them that have no might.” He wants you powered up by what He can give to you.  He wants you strengthened to serve.

Let the Lord use you in a mighty way.

 

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »