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Posts Tagged ‘transgression’

The lips of the wise spread knowledge. . .

Proverbs 15:7

As we enter what many have become familiar with as Passion Week, we continue our week by week Bible study of Jeremiah. Although he is commonly known as the Weeping Prophet, Jeremiah remains grounded as a man of compassion and integrity.

In the midst of corruption, the Jeremiah who comes to life in the pages of the Old Testament would be aligned with a whistleblower in today’s terms. Using his prophetic calling to call out Israel and Judah on their wrongdoings, Jeremiah reminds us of a mere forecast of Jesus and John the Baptist in the New Testament as they called out the religious leaders of their own time period.

John the Baptist with the Brood of Vipers Reflects Jeremiah

In Matthew 3:7, John the Baptist becomes aware of the presence of Sadducees and Pharisees as he baptized in the Jordan River. He scolds them, even calling them a “brood of vipers,” and he commands them to produce fruit “worthy of repentance.” It is obvious why many of people suspected that Jeremiah or Elijah had been reborn and manifested in this New Testament prophet. It is reflective of the Book of Jeremiah’s constant call for making amends for wrongdoing by returning to God, i.e. repentance.

Jesus Calls Out Corruption Like Jeremiah

Look at Jesus when He turned out the money changers and turned over their tables within the temple. We often hear this incident referenced as the Lord “cleansing the temple.” In fact, in the Gospel of John, Jesus goes so far as to make a whip and urge folks to be on their way and to take their wares out of the temple because He openly states that His Father’s house is not a place of business.

How is this like Jeremiah?

Much like his contemporaries Zephaniah, Ezekiel, and Habakkuk, Jeremiah was dealing with God’s people on the basis of their broken covenant with God, even the priests and other religious leaders. Keep in mind that the prophet was to call out the transgressions and rebellion against the Lord. It is quite a comparison to see the Weeping Prophet and the Lord Jesus both compelled to reach out to God’s people to change their ways or expect nothing more than coming wrath of God in due time.

Jeremiah Journey Week 13: The Ruined Sash and So Much More

Jeremiah chapter 13 opens up with an object lesson featuring the prophet’s sash (vv. 1-10). God is quick to point out to the prophet that the sash is “profitable for nothing” (v. 7). God also points out how this symbolic lesson with the sash is the same he will hand the “evil people” of Judah and Jerusalem.

The remainder of the chapter unveils more of how God will deal with Israel and Judah. It takes us through a plethora of prophetic warnings, but much of what is said hinges on a singular centralized theme of pride. In verse 15, the people are warned: “Do not be proud.” Verse 18 simply starts out: “Humble yourselves.” In the midst of everything that the Lord is spelling out and sharing in this chapter, he takes direct aim at their pride, their arrogance, and their coming shame as the Lord puts it in verse 26.

The LORD detests the proud; they will surely be punished.

proverbs 16:5 (NLT)
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What if you had to stand trial for your sins, your every trespass and transgression against God and His Law?

God Accuses the Nation of Falsehood and Adultery

Could you imagine that?

Photo by Flickr on Pexels.com

I mean it’s a situation where everything is turned around and upside down, and God directs an accusing finger in your direction and simply says to you before all the world: “And your sins have withheld good from you”[Jeremiah 5:25 (NKJV)].

Use the Bible Study Outline to Help

That’s pretty much how chapter 5 of Jeremiah seems to move. God laying out His extensive issues with Israel and Judah, especially their refusal to repent and return to Him. As we continue our weekly study of Jeremiah chapter by chapter, be sure to review the Bible study outline for chapter 5. It contains some key verses and passages from within the chapter along with some insights into this “astonishing and horrible thing” that God claims that they did among the people and throughout the land.

As We Continue Our Study

What I am truly getting out of this study is that God’s heart is on display. His character of longsuffering and lovingkindness seem to stand out as he pleads for Israel and Judah to return to Him. Yet, as we enter into chapter 5, I see another side of God saying that the inevitable is bound to occur and overwhelm the rebellious nation for her sins. I can see where God’s wrath is kindling with His anger that is set to burn against the entire nation which has said “As the Lord lives” but only meant it half-heartedly and without any real or authentic faith in the Lord (Jeremiah 5:2). The Moment by Moment blog discusses the correlation between the accused nation and the United States of America in its post on chapters 4 and 5 of Jeremiah.

As I read on, I am intrigued to see more of where God thrusts the prophet in the midst of His kinsmen. I am holding on tight and awaiting to see it all unfold.

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Have you not brought this upon yourself

by forsaking the Lord your God, when he led you in the way?

jeremiah 2:17 (ESV)

Week 1 Recap:

Jeremiah is called by God and given some anointed actions to go along with his appointment, and God offers Jeremiah both warnings and assurance.

Week 1 Summary:

God’s calling on your life can change everything.

Photo by Joshimer Biu00f1as on Pexels.com

You Played Yourself When You Turned from God

Jeremiah is directed to “Go and proclaim in the hearing of Jerusalem, Thus says the Lord. . .” (v.2), and that gets the ball rolling on a windfall of complaints against Israel from God about her conduct as one who was at one point “holy to the Lord” (v. 3). It is almost as if you hear God’s thunderous voice bellowing with anger as He directes Jeremiah. Israel has no ground to stand on as God lays out His complaint against them.

What Wrong Did Your Fathers Find in Me?

God points out that the issue isn’t a new problem. This is generational, passed down from father to children over time. He shares that it is a problem with the priests, the shepherds and the prophets as leaders, but it is the entire nation that has provoked God. “Therefore I still contend with you. . . and with your children’s children I will contend (v. 9).”

Have You Not Brought This Upon Yourself?

Don’t go blaming the Devil who supposedly entrapped you with enticements that you just could not handle. You got yourself into this one. God claims in verse 13 that he has charges against his people since they “committed two evils.” He further explains Israel’s self-imposed wrath in verse 19, plainly stating: “Your evil will chastise you , and your apostasy will reprove you. . . the fear of me is not in you , declares the Lord God of hosts.” Verse 22 provides an image that even washing with the strongest of detergents and soap won’t help cleanse this nation. “You have all transgressed against me, declares the Lord” (v.29).

Saying You’re Innocent Only Angers God More

With all of the evidence God stated against them, Israel was bold enough to try to claim innocence. But it is a if Israel’s claim of innocence angered God even more. In verse 35, Israel’s pronouncement of innocence causes God to speak vehemently: “. . . Behold, I will bring you to judgment for saying,’I have not sinned.’ ” God speaks of the nation being put to shame by both Egypt and Assyria. God will give His children that whooping out in the front yard like old school God-fearing parents used to do in the community right where all of our neighbors could see, much akin to the Law where it speaks of “before his tent”

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